My 5 Favorite Films of 2013 (and a note on the biggest film triumph of the year)

Okay, lame title for a blog post, but these aren’t exactly reviews, and I didn’t want to mislead anyone. I’m running shy of time on winter break, after all, and I have to limit my frivolous commentary. I also wanted to do some self-reflection, though, and keep a bit of a record of things that inspired, moved, or entertained me in 2013. In include both rentals and theater releases. Tomorrow will be books. New Year’s Eve will be news stories. In short, my next three blog posts will be for me, and not so much for you the reader, but thanks for reading anyway!

Movies discussed: Cloud Atlas, Django Unchained, Warm Bodies, The World’s End, Stand Up Guys, and Ender’s Game.

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In Answer to Your Questions about Inspiration

So, it’s been a while since I posted. I’d make excuses, but I don’t have any. This morning, I read an email from a high school student working on a project about inspiration and asking if I would be willing to answer some questions to help them out. I asked my artist friends on Facebook to offer a comment about the one thing they would want someone to know about inspiration, went to work, and mulled over my answers most of the day. I think I might have this all wrong, but the answers seemed worth sharing, and it had been, you know, a really long time since I posted anything over here. So double thank you to the high school student–once for making think this through and then again for giving me a blog post. Here goes:

What is inspiration to you? And where does your inspiration come from?


Inspiration is not a thing. It is a moment. I can’t predict what is going to inspire me, but I leave myself open to it at all times. Sometimes, it’s a particular shade of a particular color in a sunrise or sunset or a woman’s dress or a man’s eyes. Sometimes, it is deep internal reflection about something. Sometimes, it’s a chord in a song or a series of words in something I’m reading or a poignant news story or the tears of a friend. Sometimes it comes from my students: their stories, their triumphs, their epiphanies, their relationships with one another and with me. Often, it is loss. That can be a personal loss–a loved one, a change in major plans, a rejection of some kind–or something I perceive as a societal loss–the failure of a bill that would help people in poverty or people with disabilities, for example, two subjects that I care about deeply. For me, the only way to combat grief and loss is to make it worth something, to bring something out of it that is worth sharing.

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